The Black Shaman

Hello. I am Mark Ashford. I am a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki, and Shamanism.

I post a podcast here week on Reiki and or Shamanism. Please Subscribe to Podcast to hear more about these interesting topics. Click one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes the podcast is strictly for entertainment purposes. Listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the show. I take no responsibility for individual listener interpretations or actions.

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

Black shamanism is a kind of shamanism practiced in Mongolia and Siberia. Black shaman[1] are regarded as the most powerful of the shaman classes and sometimes known as ‘warrior- shamans’ because they battled evil forces on a “Might v’s Might” basis and were consulted as military advisors. They obtain their power from the north, the North Pole or the North Star, and could be easily identified as they always wore black robes with very little, if any, decoration. The primary function of the black shaman was to deal with demons and the dark gods on behalf of their clients. In this role they were hired to curse the client’s enemies and blight their crops and livestock.[2]

In wartime the black shamans attached themselves to the army rather like the modern padres and helped to win battles using their occult powers. They boosted the soldiers’ morale and performed ceremonies to help in battle. The power of the army was connected to the Black shamans, so these shamans were heavily recruited in times of war. Although not a shaman Chinggis Khan is the best-known practitioner and follower of Black Shamans.

In peacetime they took a more positive role as diplomats, political advisors and emissaries and they oversaw the preparation and signing of treaties with the appropriate magical rites. Black shamans were greatly feared, even after their deaths.[3]

Black shaman also performed hunting rituals, healing work, protection, divination, and put curses on tribal enemies. Black shamans have to be careful to stay in balance, for a shaman that curses too much, will lose their ability to heal and would become an outcast.

Black Shamans are so feared and caution applied to the practices of Black Shamanism that to this day, the Buryat people require anyone undergoing the rights to become a Black Shaman to undertake numerous oaths that bind the Black Shaman not to engage with dark spirits or conduct ceremonies and rituals aimed at harming people, animals, and crops.

I hope you found the podcast enjoyable and informative. Please subscribe to the podcast and click the links in these notes to find out more about our books, Online Courses, Social Media, our Patreon Page to support the channel. Thank you, and I hope to speak to you again soon.

Bibliography

https://crazzfiles.com/secrets-of-siberian-shamanism/. “Secrets of Siberian Shamanism the Crazz Files.”

Rinchen, Yönsiyebü. “White, Black and Yellow Shamans among the Mongols.” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 4, no. 2 (1981): 94-102.

Wikipedia. “Black Shamanism.”


[1] Yönsiyebü Rinchen, “White, Black and Yellow Shamans among the Mongols,” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 4, no. 2 (1981).

[2] https://crazzfiles.com/secrets-of-siberian-shamanism/, “Secrets of Siberian Shamanism the Crazz Files.”

[3] Ibid.

The Black Shaman

Hello. I am Mark Ashford. I am a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki, and Shamanism.

I post a podcast here week on Reiki and or Shamanism. Please Subscribe to Podcast to hear more about these interesting topics. Click one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes the podcast is strictly for entertainment purposes. Listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the show. I take no responsibility for individual listener interpretations or actions.

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

Black shamanism is a kind of shamanism practiced in Mongolia and Siberia. Black shaman[1] are regarded as the most powerful of the shaman classes and sometimes known as ‘warrior- shamans’ because they battled evil forces on a “Might v’s Might” basis and were consulted as military advisors. They obtain their power from the north, the North Pole or the North Star, and could be easily identified as they always wore black robes with very little, if any, decoration. The primary function of the black shaman was to deal with demons and the dark gods on behalf of their clients. In this role they were hired to curse the client’s enemies and blight their crops and livestock.[2]

In wartime the black shamans attached themselves to the army rather like the modern padres and helped to win battles using their occult powers. They boosted the soldiers’ morale and performed ceremonies to help in battle. The power of the army was connected to the Black shamans, so these shamans were heavily recruited in times of war. Although not a shaman Chinggis Khan is the best-known practitioner and follower of Black Shamans.

In peacetime they took a more positive role as diplomats, political advisors and emissaries and they oversaw the preparation and signing of treaties with the appropriate magical rites. Black shamans were greatly feared, even after their deaths.[3]

Black shaman also performed hunting rituals, healing work, protection, divination, and put curses on tribal enemies. Black shamans have to be careful to stay in balance, for a shaman that curses too much, will lose their ability to heal and would become an outcast.

I hope you found the podcast enjoyable and informative. Please subscribe to the podcast and click the links in these notes to find out more about our books, Online Courses, Social Media, our Patreon Page to support the channel. Thank you, and I hope to speak to you again soon.

Black Shamans are so feared and caution applied to the practices of Black Shamanism that to this day, the Buryat people require anyone undergoing the rights to become a Black Shaman to undertake numerous oaths that bind the Black Shaman not to engage with dark spirits or conduct ceremonies and rituals aimed at harming people, animals, and crops.

Bibliography

https://crazzfiles.com/secrets-of-siberian-shamanism/. “Secrets of Siberian Shamanism the Crazz Files.”

Rinchen, Yönsiyebü. “White, Black and Yellow Shamans among the Mongols.” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 4, no. 2 (1981): 94-102.

Wikipedia. “Black Shamanism.”


[1] Yönsiyebü Rinchen, “White, Black and Yellow Shamans among the Mongols,” Ultimate Reality and Meaning 4, no. 2 (1981).

[2] https://crazzfiles.com/secrets-of-siberian-shamanism/, “Secrets of Siberian Shamanism the Crazz Files.”

[3] Ibid.

Shaman Energy Card Reading for week 2021/01/25

Hello!

I am Mark Ashford, a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki and Shamanism and together with this YouTube Channel, I host a Podcast on Shamanism.

I post a video and podcast every week for the Shamanic Energy of the coming week. The reading is a general reading, please take from it what resonates with you.

Please Subscribe to either the YouTube Video or Podcast, whichever is best for you. Clock one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes, all videos and podcasts are strictly for entertainment purposes. Viewers and listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the readings. I take no responsibility for individual viewer interpretation or actions. Thank you.

Mystical Shaman Oracle Cards used in reading. Amazon link. – https://amzn.to/3fRG5Ow

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

For a Personal weekly Shamanic Energy Reading please go to: https://bit.ly/30PmCd3

Let’s look at the energy in the cards for this week

Fire

Fire consumes, it is destructive. In the forest it removes underbrush, old trees and all that is dead. There is chaos and danger when fire is burning.

Fire is also creative. New plants and trees grow where the old and dead have been consumed. There is order and growth when new things grow.

Fire is your passions. What do you enjoy, what gives you energy, what draws out the energy within you? When I was a scuba diver, what I did during the working day had no relevance to what I did in the evening or weekend as a diver. The passion of fire is the answer to the question, what do you enjoy, not what do you do

Fire is warmth when the sun goes down. But, beware of too much warmth. There is a point where it burns and is painful. To fully step into the energy of fire is to be utterly transformed, like the Phoenix rising from the ashes.

The fire that burns inside us can make us reactive and short-tempered toward others and situations. Fiery emotions directed at others, whether they are family, friends or colleagues can burn you when those who feel your fiery ager, have their turn, and breathe fire on you. 

Remember, do unto others as you would do unto yourself.

Standstill

Stand still represents a pause. Now is the time to pause in what you are doing. Take a breath and relax. When things stall, or stagnate, or when you feel stuck, this energy appears as a reminder that constant action isn’t going to get you where you want to go. Perhaps it’s time to gather more information or just wait until the universe makes the next move. 

Now is the time to recharge. Read that book you have wanted to but not found time to because of all the action you have created or experienced. Go out and play at something you enjoy. Recognise that Standstill is not inaction. It is just a different form of action that will give you the energy for what is to come.

Many Paths

Your Life path lays in front of you. What you bring to your journey is what will determine if yours is a path of suffering, a path of wisdom, a path of bliss, or a path of loss. 

Consider a traveler who met two stonemasons. He asks the first what he is doing, and the mason replies, “I am squaring out this stone.” He asks the second stonemason who is doing the exact same thing, and gets the reply, “I am building a cathedral.”

One has a job; the other has found his calling. He is part of an endeavor much greater than himself. Be sure you pick a path with your heart. That is your life path purpose.

That life path is calling you to take a big, bold step and leave the beaten path. The Universe are supporting your move. Now is not the time to delay, delay may cause you to miss the moment! You have outgrown your current situation and risk losing your way if you do not take this opportunity.

Be sure you attend to both your path through this earth, as well as your journey through the stars.

New Age Shamans

Hello. I am Mark Ashford. I am a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki, and Shamanism.

I post a podcast here week on Reiki and or Shamanism. Please Subscribe to Podcast to hear more about these interesting topics. Click one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes the podcast is strictly for entertainment purposes. Listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the show. I take no responsibility for individual listener interpretations or actions.

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

Let’s take a quick look at New Age Shamans and the issues that come with them.

Persecution in Soviet Russia and Communist China was systematic, organised, and state sponsored. Now shamanism faces new forms of denigration and persecution.

Changes are needed to Western notions of shamanism, the shamanic healer, and the role of altered states of consciousness (ASC). Before the Age of Enlightenment, the shaman was condemned as demoniac charlatan. From the mid-19th until the mid-20th century, the shaman was generally considered as being afflicted with a psychiatric or epileptic condition; a notion based on the misinterpretation of altered states of consciousness in shamanic rituals. [1]

It is worth noting that the shaman is not possessed during rituals. Shamanism is not a possession-based belief. Shamanic possession is not actually possession at all, but the intentional embodiment of a spirit with whom the shaman has already developed a working relationship. Possession is unintentional intrusion of a foreign spirit into a person which is considered an energetic illness or unhealthy state in shamanism. Embodiment is an effective, working, altered state the shaman is able to begin and end at will. 

Shamanism and possession nonetheless share biological features in their elicitation of ancient brain systems to modify the consciousness in relation to healing and spiritual experiences.

The word shaman has been misapplied to other indigenous healers. This was covered in detail in the first book of The Practical Shaman series. A Shaman is not a Witch Doctor, nor is the Shaman a Medicine Man/Woman.

Neoshamanism refers to “new” forms of shamanism, or methods of seeking visions or healing. Neoshamanism comprises an eclectic range of beliefs and practices that involve attempts to attain altered states and communicate with a spirit world. Neoshamanic systems may not resemble traditional forms of shamanism. Some have been invented by individual practitioners, though many borrow or gain inspiration from a variety of different indigenous cultures. In particular, indigenous cultures of the Americas have been influential. [2]

Neoshamanism is not a single, cohesive belief system, but a collective term for many philosophies and activities. However, certain generalities may be drawn between adherents. Most believe in spirits and pursue contact with the “spirit-world” in altered states of consciousness which they achieve through drumming, dance, or the use of entheogens. Most systems might be described as existing somewhere on the animism/pantheism spectrum. Some Neoshamans are not trained by any traditional shaman or member of any American indigenous culture, but rather learn independently from books and experimentation. Many attend New Age workshops and retreats, where they study a wide variety of ideas and techniques, both new and old.[3]

Some members of traditional, indigenous cultures and religions are critical of Neoshamanism, asserting that it represents an illegitimate form of cultural appropriation, or that it is nothing more than a ruse by fraudulent spiritual leaders to disguise or lend legitimacy to fabricated, ignorant, and/or unsafe elements in their ceremonies. 

One difference between Neoshamanism and traditional shamanism is the role of fear. Neoshamanism and its New Age relations tend to dismiss the existence of evil, fear, and failure. “In traditional shamanism, the shaman’s initiation is an ordeal involving pain, hardship and terror. New Age, by contrast is a religious perspective that denies the ultimate reality of the negative, and this would devalue the role of fear as well.”[4]

Inaccurate representation, misrepresentation and careless referencing, attributing actions and belief systems to what is truly a shaman are a danger to shamans everywhere.

Cultural Appropriation 

Cultural appropriation is the adoption of an element or elements of one culture or identity by members of another culture or identity. This can be controversial when members of a dominant culture appropriate from disadvantaged minority cultures.[5]

Cultural appropriation differs from acculturation, assimilation, or equal cultural exchange in that this appropriation is a form of colonialism. When cultural elements are copied from a minority culture by members of a dominant culture, these elements are used outside of their original cultural context—sometimes even against the expressly stated wishes of members of the originating culture. [6]

It is easy to see that removing the original meaning of cultural elements from their traditional heritage is exploitive. Meaning and context are lost or distorted and disrespectful to the heritage of the people to whom it belongs. 

Important cultural elements have deep meaning to the original culture. Reducing them “exotic” fashion, or toys, by a more dominant culture devalues what has been appropriated.[7] Reducing important cultural elements by imitation devalues the original indigenous source and its people who value and hold what has been appropriated in high regard.

This leads us to the term Plastic shaman, or plastic medicine people, is a pejorative colloquialism applied to individuals who are attempting to pass themselves off as shamans, holy people, or other traditional spiritual leaders, but who have no genuine connection to the traditions or cultures they claim to represent. In some cases, the “plastic shaman” may have some genuine cultural connection, but is seen to be exploiting that knowledge for ego, power, or money.[8]

I hope you found the podcast enjoyable and informative. Please subscribe to the podcast and click the links in these notes to find out more about our books, Online Courses, Social Media, our Patreon Page to support the channel. Thank you, and I hope to speak to you again soon.

Bibliography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_appropriation. “Cultural Appropriation – Wikipedia.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_shaman. “Plastic Shaman – Wikipedia.”

JILEK, WOLFGANG G. “Transforming the Shaman Changing Western Views of Shamanism and Altered States of Consciousness.”

Wikipedia. “Neoshamanism.”


[1] WOLFGANG G. JILEK, “Transforming the Shaman Changing Western Views of Shamanism and Altered States of Consciousness.”

[2] Wikipedia, “Neoshamanism.”

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_appropriation, “Cultural Appropriation – Wikipedia.”

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_shaman, “Plastic Shaman – Wikipedia.”

Shaman Energy Card Reading for week 2021/01/18

Hello!

I am Mark Ashford, a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki and Shamanism and together with this YouTube Channel, I host a Podcast on Shamanism.

I post a video and podcast every week for the Shamanic Energy of the coming week. The reading is a general reading, please take from it what resonates with you.

Please Subscribe to either the YouTube Video or Podcast, whichever is best for you. Clock one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes, all videos and podcasts are strictly for entertainment purposes. Viewers and listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the readings. I take no responsibility for individual viewer interpretation or actions. Thank you.

Mystical Shaman Oracle Cards used in reading. Amazon link. – https://amzn.to/3fRG5Ow

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

For a Personal weekly Shamanic Energy Reading please go to: https://bit.ly/30PmCd3

Let’s look at the energy in the cards for this week

Magic

To a child, the world around them is full of magical things, the child sees everything as possible. Even though we are in a pandemic, flowers still bloom, babies are conceived, and born, these are all signs of potential and the child see this and believes in it.

As we grow and shape our lives, we must pay attention to the signs that tell us we are on the right path. We must look for the next action to take. We must also know to stay the course and not be diverted away from what we need to pay attention to. 

Magic tells you that you are doing the right things, with the right energy and the right intention to make your dreams come true. The Universe, your angels and guides, all are supporting you and listening, acting on your behalf! Pay attention to them. Magic gives birth to miracles.

The Sorcerer

The Sorcerer is the Black Shaman. The Black Shaman works with and for the malevolent spirits, he or she is destructive to human existence. The Black Shaman is called on and paid by those who have a self-centered behavior and desire to harm others to gain what they want, or, prevent others from achieving their goal.

Think, if you are a supervisor, did you stop someone leaving early to take care of a child, or an aging parent because you could, not because there was another solution? It is easier to harm someone or something than to create.   

Take a moment to look into and at the destructive part of your psyche that misuses power, or holds on to and values resentment, vengeance, lust, greed, bigotry, or hatred. 

The Sorcerer is an energy that challenges you. Challenges you to change your thinking and feelings. This is a card of second chances. From this moment forward think, feel and act differently. Do not value the darkness in you and around you. Even if darkness is done to you. 

The Corn

Corn us food, it is nourishment. Grow it, eat it, crush it and transform it into something else to eat. The stalks can be used for roofing and with the mud of Mother Gaia, make walls.

It represents the mother of sustenance and tangible abundance. This symbol represents material prosperity in the world and provides stability and sustenance to many. There is more than enough to go around.

Corn is planted, then grows and when it has finished growing its fruit appears. In our lives, we plant many things, ideas, hopes, wishes. Even plans are planted, a plan is really a description of how our ideas will bring about what we need and hope for. 

In moments when you were losing faith, you continued. Remember, it is always darkest before the dawn but you continued on, planting and nurturing. Now the spirit of the Corn comes to honor this and show you how bountiful the harvest is. 

The corn takes time to grow and provide the abundance you are about to reap. It is time to be warry of shortcuts, things that seem to be too good or inner feelings of being entitled to a certain outcome. 

The farmer, like you, knows deep down that the crop must be nurtured, the farmer plants the seed corn with intention and respectfully in conjunction with Mother Gaia. Let go of insecurity, feelings or thoughts of there not being enough, or that someone else could take what is yours. You have all you need for success.

The corn says this is your time to receive. Regardless of whether the rewards are financial or the kind of prosperity measured in quality rather than quantity. Corn is a symbol of blessing. Don’t forget to share your good fortune.

A Shaman is not a Witch Doctor

Hello. I am Mark Ashford. I am a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki, and Shamanism.

I post a podcast here week on Reiki and or Shamanism. Please Subscribe to Podcast to hear more about these interesting topics. Click one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes the podcast is strictly for entertainment purposes. Listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the show. I take no responsibility for individual listener interpretations or actions.

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

The word “witchcraft” elicits the worst stereotypical, virulent, and extremely negative images in most people’s mind. There is almost a conditioned reflex to the word. The term automatically evokes and reinforces images of “ignorance,” “backwardness,” “primitive,” “uncivilized,” “superstitious,” “undeveloped”. It tends to confirm deeply ingrained negative opinions of the society and the individuals who are known as Witch doctors.

A witch doctor was originally a type of healer who treated ailments believed to be caused by witchcraft. The term witch doctor is sometimes used to refer to healers, particularly in regions which use traditional healing rather than contemporary medicine.[1]

In its original meaning, witchdoctors were emphatically not witch’s themselves, but rather people who had remedies to protect others against witchcraft. Within their tribe or community, a witchdoctor was a user of magic, who by use of spells, charms, herbal remedies, and incantations sought to cure illness, detect witches, and counteract malevolent magical influences. Witchcraft-induced conditions were their area of expertise. 

Since the missionaries thought that they were introducing civilization into Africa, they denounced African institutions, including African approaches to healing. They referred to medicine-men and women who were highly respected for their services as “witchdoctors”. On the attitude of Europeans to African healing, Ndung’u and Mwaura explain that “The whole process of healing was in the eyes of the missionaries, part of a wide scheme of witchcraft and paganism and had to be eradicated in order to pave way for western civilization and the Gospel” (Ndung’u and Mwaura 2008, 46). [2]

“When people see havoc in medical institutions, powerlessness of doctors, they go to healers. When it’s a child, they want to turn the world upside down to cure it. So, people go to healers searching for miracle. This is not about the level of education of those people who go to healers, but about the level of trust in the medicine offered by the state,”[3]

Whilst no one will deny that the tribes throughout Africa. as a whole, believe in witchcraft it does not follow that the witchdoctor himself is feared or that he is the evil person that many people depict him to be. Indeed, amongst the Shona people he is a much respected and, I might add, a much beloved person, and– if I may be permitted to make the comparison- he is even regarded with the same attachment that the doctor enjoys in European society.[4]

Most Africans believe in the existence of the witch, and to most people the witch denotes a person with an evil spirit capable of causing untold misery, tragedy and death upon any innocent victim. Again, to the Shona people the witch, like the witchdoctor, is spiritually endowed. but with a spirit which operates against the interests of mankind. The witch, like the witchdoctor, also inherits a spirit, generally from the mother, and this trait is handed down in the family. The witch practices witchcraft and is able to manipulate occult forces to the detriment of man–quite the opposite to the witchdoctor, who operates the forces for the good of mankind. Thus, the only difference really between the witchdoctor and the witch is the eternal difference of good and bad.[5]

The fountainhead of the belief in magic and witchcraft is the witchdoctor, and the continuance of this philosophy rests on him. As long as he exists, so long can we accept his presence as the indication of his people’s belief and dependence on magic and witchcraft. Once he goes this extraordinary ancient philosophy will disappear as well.

The witchdoctor’s functions thus extend far beyond the mere prescribing of an herb, albeit this be an important aspect of his practice. He is the hub around which the magical or spiritual world revolves, giving succor and support to those in need and at the same time being the means of ensuring good behaviour.[6]

The roles of the witch doctor are very different from the Shaman in this context and is reliant on the existence of a witch, someone who communicates with the spirit world to do harm to others. As with the Medicine Man/Woman, described earlier, many of the attributes of the shaman are not present when discussing witch doctors. 

Interestingly, the men and women in Europe recognized as white witches who practice witchcraft. the only difference from the witch discussed here is that a white which serves the people, and is much sought after to cure their diseases. Therefore, the white witch really corresponds to the African witchdoctor and in essence there is no difference between the witchdoctor and the white witch except in their handling of the powers of Nature.[7]

I hope you found the podcast enjoyable and informative. Please subscribe to the podcast and click the links in these notes to find out more about our books, Online Courses, Social Media, our Patreon Page to support the channel. Thank you, and I hope to speak to you again soon.

Bibliography

Alyaeva, Dinara. Director, Pomogat Legko, Russia.

GELFAND, MICHAEL. “Medicine and Magic.” The Central African Journal of Medicine.

Mumo, Peter M. “Holistic Healing, an Analytical Review of Medicine-Men in African Societies.”

Wikipedia. “Witch Doctor.”


[1] Wikipedia, “Witch Doctor.”

[2] Peter M. Mumo, “Holistic Healing, an Analytical Review of Medicine-Men in African Societies.”

[3] Dinara. Director Alyaeva, Pomogat Legko, Russia, Interview.

[4] MICHAEL GELFAND, “Medicine and Magic,” The Central African Journal of Medicine.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7]  ibid.

Shaman Energy Card Reading for week 2021/01/11

Hello!

I am Mark Ashford, a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki and Shamanism and together with this YouTube Channel, I host a Podcast on Shamanism.

I post a video and podcast every week for the Shamanic Energy of the coming week. The reading is a general reading, please take from it what resonates with you.

Please Subscribe to either the YouTube Video or Podcast, whichever is best for you. Clock one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes, all videos and podcasts are strictly for entertainment purposes. Viewers and listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the readings. I take no responsibility for individual viewer interpretation or actions. Thank you.

Mystical Shaman Oracle Cards used in reading. Amazon link. – https://amzn.to/3fRG5Ow

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

For a Personal weekly Shamanic Energy Reading please go to: https://bit.ly/30PmCd3

Let’s look at the energy in the cards for this week,

Wild Woman

Energy, freedom of expression, passion. These are all things the Wild Woman speaks to. The energy in this card speaks to your inner purity. No matter what life brings us, throws at us, we have an inner core of sparkling, free energy. If you are keeping this hidden or bottled up for some reason, maybe you are frightened of what is in you? Now is the time to let the bright light shine regardless of what your egoic mind says. You do not live in the container it creates by worrying about consequences, that do not materialise. Listen to your inner self. Be true, open and expressive. Let the Great Spirit decide what happens. You’ll be happy you did.

Mystical Shaman

This card speaks to the myths we dream and the stories we wish to write. Now is the time to be author of your life’s story. Do not allow others to write a story for you and expect you to follow it. Create your own and be true to it. Live it, be in the NOW, the moment and enjoy the story you create for yourself. 

Life, like a coin has two sides, a spiritual one, where you learn and grow. You grow by both the pleasures and happiness of life, the colour of flowers, love of and for animals, pets, and people who bring good things in to your life. You grow by the challenges, stress, and unhappiness which you navigate through. You grow by the physical essence of life. The taste of new food and wine, how the fitness and health allow you to venture out, to touch and feel, and smell.

On the other side of the coin, if the story you are following is not yours, let your story, the one you write for yourself break through. Do not fixate on the ending, a good story is worth the read, the turning of every page to see what is next. Live in your story, in the moment. Be in the NOW.

The Rainbow

In the Himalayas, the rainbow is seen as the full realization of our essence. The rainbow is a part of us, the colours of a rainbow are the colours of the Seven Chakras that are in each of us. We have to look up and in the right direction after a storm to see a rainbow created by the Sun. The rainbow symbolizes the end of the storm we have just passed through. It affirms all is well and that you are in right relationship with Spirit.

There may still be a few storm clouds in the sky, but they will pass. Remember the saying, “the night always appears darkest before dawn.” Continue your work, do not give up, do not surrender hope or positive belief in your future and what you are doing. Also, this is not the time to claim victory, it has not arrived yet, the Laurel crown of victory is not quite complete, even if you can sense it coming.

A Shaman is not a Medicine Man

Hello. I am Mark Ashford. I am a Registered Reiki Teacher and Practitioner and a Usui Tibetan Reiki Master Teacher as well as a Shaman. I am a published author of books and online courses on Reiki, and Shamanism.

I post a podcast here week on Reiki and or Shamanism. Please Subscribe to Podcast to hear more about these interesting topics. Click one of the following links in the show notes to learn more about our offerings.

For legal purposes the podcast is strictly for entertainment purposes. Listeners have free will and are entirely responsible for any interpretation they place on the show. I take no responsibility for individual listener interpretations or actions.

To learn more about my work click here https://bit.ly/3h3E6I0

A medicine man or medicine woman, there is no gender restriction, is a traditional healer and spiritual leader who serves a community of indigenous people of the Americas. Each culture uses their own name, in their respective Indigenous languages, for the spiritual healers and ceremonial leaders in their particular cultures. [1]

In indigenous North American communities, “medicine” usually refers to spiritual healing. This should not be confused with practitioners who employ Native American ethnobotany, a practice that is very common in a large number of Native American and First Nations households.

Ethnobotany is the study of a region’s plants and their practical uses through the traditional knowledge of a local culture and people. An ethnobotanist strives to document the local customs involving the practical uses of local flora for many aspects of life, such as plants as medicines, foods, and clothing.[2]

A medicine man or woman usually caries a small pouch, that contains sacred items. A personal medicine bag may contain objects that symbolize personal well-being and tribal identity. Traditionally, medicine bags are worn under the clothing. [3] Their contents are private, and often of a personal and religious nature.

Other terms for Medicine Man/Woman are “medicine people” or “ceremonial people” are sometimes used in Native American and First Nations communities, for example, when Arwen Nuttall (Cherokee) of the National Museum of the American Indian writes, “The knowledge possessed by medicine people is privileged, and it often remains in particular families.” [3]

Native American indigenous people are reluctant to discuss issues about medicine or medicine people with non-Indians. And, in some cultures, the people will not even discuss these matters with members of other tribes. In most tribes, medicine elders are prohibited from advertising or introducing themselves as such. As Nuttall writes, “An inquiry to a Native person about religious beliefs or ceremonies is often viewed with suspicion.”[4]

One example of this is the Apache medicine cord or Izze-kloth whose purpose and use by Apache medicine elders was a mystery to nineteenth century ethnologists because “the Apache look upon these cords as so sacred that strangers are not allowed to see them, much less handle them or talk about them.” [5]

The term “medicine man/woman,” like the term “shaman,” has been criticized by Native Americans, as well as other specialists in the fields of religion and anthropology. [6]

While non-Native anthropologists sometimes use the term “shaman” for Indigenous healers worldwide, including the Americas, “shaman” is the specific name for a spiritual mediator from the Tungstic peoples of Siberia and is not used in Native American or First Nations communities. [7]

The term “medicine man/woman” has also frequently been used by Europeans to refer to African traditional healers, along with the offensive term “witch doctors”. [8] The term “witch doctor is also considered to have a negative connotation, or, it’s use is intended to belittle or disparage an indigenous healer.

A medicine man, or woman’s approach to sickness, disease or misfortune, is to strive to discover the root cause[s] and divine how to prevent the symptoms and conditions from recurring. Rather than the symptom/cure-based approach of modern medicine. They do this by exploring the supernatural causes of ill-health.

There is great emphasis on medicinal plants to heal colds, cough, fever, asthma, and insect bites. A medicine man/woman is a person with mysterious power over medicine or magic or other mysterious arts in general. The individual is aware that some medicine is good and beneficial in treating an illness, some evil or bad. Bad medicine may be infective, or make the condition worse.[9] It might also be poisonous. 

Of all the African religious specialists, medicine-men were the most useful, and people consult them frequently. They acted as the link between the people and the supernatural realm. Africans believe the cause of ill-health, misfortunes and other afflictions could be traced to the invisible world. Since most of the people did not have the ability to communicate with the forces that controlled that world, the medicine-men became very useful (Magesa 1997,210). [10]

As with other specialists in African Religion, medicine-men/women receive a calling to the profession. Africans believe some were born with the ability, having been born holding divination pebbles. The mid-wives would take note of relevant signs and inform the mothers that they had special children. In other cases, a medicine-man would pass on the profession to his son or other younger relative (Mbiti 1969, 167). Yet others received their calling through visions or dreams (Magesa1997,217). In addition, upcoming medicine- men went through training that involved attachment to practicing medicine-men. The trainees learnt the several ways available of dealing with health issues. Africans believed that medicine men possessed special gifts or powers (Magesa 1997, 219). Through training they were shown how to utilize those gifts and powers. After training, they were officially installed through a ceremony presided over by a medicine-man.[11]

Both Christianity and colonialism in Africa sought to discredit African psychological healing, which involves promoting the mental and emotional well-being of the individual and the techniques developed for psychological healing is developed in an African environment to address specific problems. Some Africans afflicted by certain crises can only be addressed using this approach. These afflictions include barrenness, mental disturbances, misfortunes and effects of witchcraft and sorcery in humans, combined with unproductive farms and animals (Mumo2009, 63). [12]

Comparing a shaman to a medicine man or woman there are some notable differences. The shaman soul journey’s either for themselves or at the request of another for healing purposes. A soul journey may also be undertaken to retrieve a soul or to help guide a lost spirit or a spirit that has not crossed over into the spirit world. Battles and confrontations with evil or dark spirits and souls may be undertaken to help a sick individual. The shaman’s universe includes an upper, middle and lower realm where spirits exist, along with the spirits of ancestors who must be understood and persuaded to help a soul in its current physical incarnation.

A shaman experiences possession by a spirit guide during a healing ceremony. It is also the case that a spirit guide maybe human or animal, but it is a guide they are familiar with and have a close relationship with. 

Generally, a shaman, especially one form Mongolia and Tibet, does very little work with regard to herbs and natural herbal treatments.

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Bibliography

“Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the… Pdf.” Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology.

Eastburn, Drake. “Healer, Shaman, Facilitator.” International Journal of Complementary & Alternative Medicine 5, no. 2 (2017).

INDIAN, THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN. “Do All Indians Live in Tipis?”.

Mumo, Peter M. “Holistic Healing, an Analytical Review of Medicine-Men in African Societies.”

Wikipedia. “Ethnobotany.”

———. “Medicine Bag.”

———. “Medicine Man.”


[1] Wikipedia, “Medicine Man.”

[2] “Ethnobotany.”

[3] THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN, “Do All Indians Live in Tipis?.”

[4] Ibid.

[5] “Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the… Pdf,” Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology.

[6] Wikipedia, “Medicine Man.”

[7] Drake Eastburn, “Healer, Shaman, Facilitator,” International Journal of Complementary & Alternative Medicine 5, no. 2 (2017).

[8] Ibid.

[9] Peter M. Mumo, “Holistic Healing, an Analytical Review of Medicine-Men in African Societies.”

[10] Ibid.

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.